Pointed consideration – Part II

June 7, 2016

The last time I tried to write several brief tidbits from arbitrary story worlds, I proclaimed it too difficult to give “a point” to each one. Now I will do better.

As I said a post prior, I am taking one step into the meta above my own writing. I have filled this blog with writing exercises using randomly-generated features such as gender of character, number of character traits or dimensions, specific traits from a list of 100, names from my Space Trader game, equipment from my non-published loot tables, and story genre. Typically I would designate a point or theme to give a purpose to this writing. Now I have enough “points” that I can randomize these as well and have a writing exercise that, to use technical terminology, shall be completely whacked out.

So to begin.

I will use RANDOM.ORG as usual. All the above will be allowed to vary, including character geometry from one to three dimensions. The loot tables were generated for a post-apocalyptic setting, so I will need to rewrite their content and meaning basically every time, but the process of doing so may be helpful in establishing the character’s role. Of course, everything gets blurry anyway when doing these things: I’m reminded that the names from my Space Trader game are a mass of mixed-culture references.

For fun, after preparing each 2-D or 3-D character, I will flip a virtual coin to see if I follow up with a “1-D creature class” in the same story world, like those I did in my first character design exercise and others that took after it. I get:

Paranormal story world. “Don’t betray all of your friends, or else you’ll be a nasty person and you might die.”
Two-dimensional character. Male. Traitorous, noble. Craft materials.
One-dimensional creature class. Doomsaying. Bandages.

Mechs story world. “Can the darkness ever truly leave our hearts?”
Three-dimensional character. Male. Scoundrel, depressed, disgruntled. Hammers and wrenches.
One-dimensional creature class. Formal. Fists.

Fantasy story world. “Pride goeth before a fall.”
Three-dimensional character. Female. Bookish, restless, sarcastic. Spell components.

Science horror story world. “One fears the unknown.”
One-dimensional character. Male. Desperately hopeful. Mutant fungus and herbology.

. . . This is going to be something else. Again, if you are interested in anything I post and want to use it somewhere (such as in a tabletop gaming session), just ask me. I like to know where my children are.

2-D character: Pygmalion Rama. (My random rolls said “Galatea,” but I figured on a male character at this time.)
Traits: Traitorous, noble.
Description: Once a figure on a mystical court of intrigue halfway between our world and the next, with the bearing to match. He is pale and his expensive attire has only the slightest rents and tears.
Dialogue: Written – “A walk of the grounds revealed three small children from a nearby school playing at the dead. I must send word to their parents.”
Written – “When I occasion to pass by the paintings I am reminded of old associates memorialized within. Or, in one case, immortalized.”
Written – “The advent of new arrivals has motivated me to put on my face and greet them with the aid of my assistants. They have agreed, quite reasonably, to undertake certain tasks for me. Perhaps it is time to revisit my crafts.”
Written – “It was clear that the new arrivals would rummage about my writings without decorum. They are a curious sort. It is for this reason that I have chosen the crafted word, not the blended paint, for my binding agent.”

1-D creature class: Bound Ghosts.
Trait: Doomsaying.
Description: If it made sense for a mummy also to be a ghost, then mummy ghosts is what these would be. Bound to their master by mystical cloth wrapped to a precise formula, these men and women now handle the material aspects of running Pygmalion’s property. Such as speaking with visitors whatsoever.
Dialogue: Intro – “Welcome, I regret, to the Edmund Estates. The master may be with you shortly, and we may have his word for you shortly thereafter.”
Idle – “Oh, not again.”
Idle – “The master surely has a plan for this one.”
Idle – “It is only a matter of time . . . ”
Idle – “When will they learn?”

3-D character: Itokawa Nyx.
Traits: Scoundrel, depressed, disgruntled.
Description: The rogue mechanic of the Western Wastes, a sturdy man with pencil-thin mustache and baggy clothes like an old martial arts gi. As a side project, he has over-crafted one oversized hammer to give him negotiating power when customers come calling.
Dialogue: Intro – “You want me to fix your ride. I know it. That’s the only reason you’re standing in my sunlight. Well, do you plan on trading fair and square, or is this one of those deals we have to beat out with a hammer?”
Idle – “Never seen a deal that didn’t go south. For somebody.”
Idle – “Still waiting for a real payout.”
Event – “Now you expect me to rebuild this whole thing, don’t you? Do you have the cash?”
Event – “Looks like you’re bleeding out real bad there. Oh, well. Scrap is scrap.”

1-D creature class: Gladiatorial Bots
Trait: Formal.
Description: The most polite blood sport competitors in the world, just without the blood. They are the unmanned combatant robots that round out a mech arena match against live pilots.
Dialogue: Idle – “Online now, sir or madam. Ready to mirror your most savage desires.”
Idle – “Battle is always invigorating! For whomever still stands at the end.”
Fight – “Pardon!”
Fight – “Like so!”
Fight – “Oof, good one!”

3-D character: Crescentia Pathin.
Traits: Bookish, restless, sarcastic.
Description: A retailer of spell components outside the schools of wizardry, robed and spectacled as proper. She has to deal with the college crowd just as with foolhardy adventurers.
Dialogue: Intro – “You there. What do you get when you know half the secrets of the arcane, have half the shares in a mana mine, and owe half a college tuition? Customers.”
Idle – “If you’re not buying, good for you.”
Idle – “A book or a walk: stick to the healthy choices, I say.”
Event – “Do you know how to use that?”
Event – “Don’t come to me when you blow it up in your face.”
Event – “I could demonstrate, but I’ll just let you break it yourself.”

1-D character: Igor Zeus. (I said that these names were a chaotic mix.)
Trait: Desperately hopeful.
Description: One more worker for Quadra Corp, the premier company in fungal hybrid technologies. He and his many labcoated colleagues can be found standing near computer terminals, banging on doors, or being menaced by unleashed fungoid horrors.
Dialogue: Intro – “I don’t care who you are. It’s just one more mystery to me. And to me, the only way to stay safe is to know as little as possible. Now get out of my way.”
Idle – “If I can reach command, I’ll be fine.”
Idle – “They’re sprouting. They’re sprouting!”
Idle – “We can stop these things, can’t we?”
Event – “The lights are out! And what’s that sound?”
Event – “Oh, no. They’re not my colleagues. Whatever they are now, start shooting!”

. . . There! Having only a small amount of space for each theme, I came to see where communicating the point of the story or game would take significantly more effort than I could provide: some dialogue wound up being about the character’s goals, some about the overall point, and then for anything else I was out of room. As was expressed in the talk on character geometry I’ve referenced throughout this blog, further dimensions require further space to express. You cannot fit a believable three- or four-dimensional person into a bit role with one speech. Likewise, conveying the point of the writing takes more than a few words.

Unless, I suppose, one were to take up poetry. That is its own topic for its own time.

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